http://www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/glossary-terms?letter=B

TRUST? The internet isn’t guaranteed for reliability and integrity of information. I’d need to go and check in books and verify source information and I’m not getting anywhere today! (this isn’t inspiring either so far, but it IS interesting and some notes to come back to, if I must make a little online working it out book for future reference… and actually i enjoyed it entirely but in spite of it being noted as not inspiring, i asn’t far past Bob Kaufmann when i had to break to flip an effort of my own out, interrupting my study for fear of being overwhelmed and consumed by it in that very moment …

beat poets (having looked at an Emily Dickinsone mid 18th century example and think i’ve read some online a little a few months ago… not at all interested in history but enjoy some of the poems – checking out instead of golden oldies some contemporary-ish poets and poetry forms… American…

BEAT POETS = 1950s (counter-culture) …national group stemming from San Francisco (Western US) …

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/244384                                                       Bob Kaufmann, (b.1925-d.1986) poem “Believe, Believe” and these two lines in particular convey powerful multiplicity of meaning and potential intent “Not in blue-suited insects,Infesting society’s garments.”

Difficult to read the full poem first-off, while in rhymed-poem-mindset… but if you think musically (JAZZ) – and I love Zappa and co – but can’t quote much verse unless I listen again – I should put an archival CD on just to annoy Gail, Frank’d love itis my guess… absolutely free… 10p for the disc mind at the time… and i’m doing some British-pop-poetry culture writing before I dig that deep in foreign soil, however fertile it MIGHT seem in comparison to our tiny little island in the wonderful wider world of street culture. I’ve been listening to Summar Telsie’s poetic readings of some of my non-poetic writing and Colleen’s proper rhyming good poems and so starting to get the hang of reading it (poetry) a bit better. Had to at least THINK Zappa first for brain cells to kick in…twist and turn the pace it works quite well… were Zappa and co San Francisco circle? (think, so…brain-whirr-clunk!)

i wouldn’t agree that this Kaufmann work is free verse in the ways that I would agree that the Lew Welch examples below ARE free verse, but i wouldn’t have called them any kind of verse…! Poetry’s a bit confusing like that. However i do have to verify the integrity of the information from this web-site, knowing nothing about these people or their works and always a good idea to cross-reference source info or u might infringe publishing companies copyright accreditation and it might only take a drop-down menu error typo on site admin these days. i’m a bit of a glutton for punishment and prefer to do the virtual leg work. So a trip to a library at some point would b very nice – and i have had a real world flippin lecture call an’all… but it is a good one, and if i’ve done enough writing to get let out early, maybe i’ll hit a party invite up-turning, though it is still doubtful for either… back to study or i’m back at trussedtrewtryzers…

Bob Kaufmann was a street poet of oral tradition, according to the extra contextual information from a  link near the bottom of the page that I very almost missed! He also remained silent from the day of President J.F.Kennedy’s assination until the day the Vietnam War ended.

  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/244552                                                   Lew Welch (b.1926, d. 1971) ~~~~of course, being typically human, I would enjoy this example:

“Why is it,” he said, “that no matter what you say,
a woman always takes it personally?”
 
“I never do,” she said.
 http://www.poetryfoundation.org/browse/poets#school-period=3
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Diane di Primer, b.1934
various accolades, including awards for Lifetime Service and Lifetime Achievement and was named Poet Laureate of San Francisco in 2009, born in Brooklyn, New York, later moved to Manhattan before becoming friends with Beat Poets and moving to San Francisco.
Incredibly beautiful poetry, extremely well-crafted, natural and accessible but non-conventional versing and structure, very different to the other two very different examples of poet and poem outlined above..
“I think tomorrow turned you from his toe…” is a small part of a poem called “The Window”, it’s a poem of grief, love and acceptance, for a friend perhaps. Reminds me very much of Sylvia Frank, whose poetry I love dearly. Earlier in the poem one particular verse stands out of exceptional quality :
“this kind of bird flies backwards
and this love
breaks on a window pane
where no light talks”
i very much enjoyed Paracelsus also, saving others to view another day… running out of road…
(All extracts in pink on this page obtained from the Poetry Foundation.org web-site and assumed correct, all other writing my own).
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